Lalita Ramakrishnan (Cambridge) 1: Tuberculosis: The Pathogenic Personality of the Tubercle bacillus

  • By :
  • Category : Video
Video

Lalita Ramakrishnan gives an introduction to tuberculosis (TB) pathogenesis, gives an overview of Mycobacterium tuberculosis’ life cycle, and explains how the TB bacteria gain entry into the host. Part 1: An Introduction to Tuberculosis: The Pathogenic Personality of the Tubercle bacillus: Lalita Ramakrishnan gives an introduction to tuberculosis (TB) pathogenesis, and gives an overview of Mycobacterium tuberculosis’ life cycle. Part 2: The Troublesome Tubercle in Tuberculosis: After the tuberculosis (TB) bacteria infect macrophages, a complex structure called a granuloma develops. Ramakrishnan explains how her laboratory used a zebrafish model of TB to study the involvement of granulomas in TB progression. Part 3: Tuberculosis as an Inflammatory Disease: Lalita Ramakrishnan’s laboratory has studied the molecular pathogenesis of TB using the power of forward genetics in the zebrafish. https://www.ibiology.org/ibioseminars/introduction-tuberculosis-pathogenic-personality-tubercle-bacillus.html Talk Overview: In this seminar, Dr. Lalita Ramakrishnan gives an introduction to tuberculosis (TB) pathogenesis, and gives an overview of Mycobacterium tuberculosis’ life cycle. She explains how the TB bacteria gain entry into the host by using specific lipids to avoid microbicidal macrophages and recruit growth-permissive ones. Once inside the macrophage, the bacteria use multiple virulence genes to survive intracellularly. In particular, Ramakrishnan discusses bacterial efflux pumps that, in addition to promoting intracellular survival, also induce tolerance to multiple antibiotics. Most individuals have effective counterstrategies so that they are able to clear TB infection by a combination of innate and adaptive immunity. Yet scientists have not been able to understand these defense strategies enough to harness them and create an effective vaccine against TB. After the TB bacteria infect macrophages, a complex structure called a granuloma develops. Different immune cells arrive at the granuloma to surround the bacterial infection and fight the disease. In her second lecture, Ramakrishnan explains how her laboratory used a zebrafish model of TB to study the involvement of granulomas in TB progression. Although granulomas were thought to constrain infection, her laboratory showed that the bacteria hijack the granulomas to spread the disease. For example, Ramakrishnan showed that TB bacteria promote the recruitment of new macrophages to the granuloma that engulf dying infected macrophages to expand infection. Ramakrishnan’s laboratory has studied the molecular pathogenesis of TB using the power of forward genetics in the zebrafish. They discovered that mutations in LTA4H, a key enzyme in the eicosanoid pathway that alters the levels of the cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF), affect tuberculosis pathogenesis by regulating the inflammatory response. This work showed that a balance of TNF is required for good TB prognosis, and neither high nor low inflammation was favorable. Correspondingly, they showed that genetic variation in LTA4H in humans helps explain patterns of TB meningitis survival when patients were exposed to a treatment that suppresses the inflammatory response. Speaker Biography: Dr. Lalita Ramakrishnan is a professor of immunology and infectious diseases at the University of Cambridge, UK. She received her medical degree from the Baroda Medical College in India, and her PhD in Immunology from Tufts University in Boston. After completing her medical residency at Tufts and a fellowship in Infectious Diseases at the University of California, San Francisco, she joined the lab of Dr. Stanley Falkow at Stanford University as a postdoctoral fellow.  There she developed Mycobacterium marinum as a model for to study tuberculosis pathogenesis. She then joined the faculty at the University of Washington, where her laboratory developed the zebrafish infected with M. marinum as a model for tuberculosis. In 2014, she moved to the University of Cambridge, where her laboratory continues to unravel the molecular underpinnings of TB pathogenesis. Ramakrishnan’s work has been recognized with several awards and honors, including the NIH Director’s Pioneer Award, the Wellcome Trust Principal Research Fellowship and election to the US National Academy of Sciences (2015). Learn more about Ramakrishnan’s research here: https://www.med.cam.ac.uk/ramakrishnan/From: iBiology

Source: http://bppro.link/?c=R5F

No Comments

Leave a Reply

Video
What goes up must come down: classic car values dip in 2016

For the past few years, some of the most solid investments a person could make were in classic cars. From 2012 onward, the value of vintage models has skyrocketed to heights the market has never seen before. But, nothing lasts forever. The most recent report on the state of collectible …

Video
Dr. Edmond Eger II, 86, Dies; Found Way to Make Anesthesia Safer

Dr. Eger and colleagues developed a technique to determine the proper dosage of anesthesia in operating rooms all over the world, saving an untold number of lives. Source: http://bppro.link/?c=WRt

Video
Medium: Why Bloggers Should Consider Publishing on Medium

Want to position yourself as an authority on a specific subject? Have you considered publishing your blog posts on Medium? To explore how Medium can benefit bloggers and marketers, I interview Dakota Shane. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social …